• Episode

    Episode 4: Development and Teleomusicality with Mariusz Kozak and guest Andrea Schiavio

    Music Theorist Mariusz Kozak recommends “When the Sound Becomes the Goal. 4E Cognition and Teleomusicality in Early Infancy” by Andrea Schiavio, Dylan van der Schyff, Silke Kruse-Weber and Renee Timmers, published in Frontiers in Psychology. Marius and Finn interview Andrea about this framing of early musical development and implications of an embodied, embedded, extended and enactive approach to cognitive science.

    Time Stamps

    • [0:00:10] Intro with Mariusz
    • [0:11:16] Interview: Origins and the 4 Es
    • [0:21:40] Interview: Attention, Intention, and Mirror Neurons
    • [0:32:59] Interview: Sound Goals and Musical Actions
    • [0:40:28] Interview: Reception of Theory
    • [0:53:03] Closing with Mariusz

    Show notes

    • Recommended article:
    • Interviewee: Dr. Andrea Schiavio, Postdoctoral Researcher at University of Graz
    • Co-host: Prof. Mariusz Kozak, Assistant Professor of Music at Columbia University
    • Works cited in the discussion:
      • Chemero, A. (2011). Radical embodied cognitive science. MIT press.
      • Craighero, L., Leo, I., Umilta, C., and Simion, F. (2011). Newborns’ preference for goal-directed actions. Cognition, 20, 26–32. doi: 10.1016/j.cognition.2011 02.011
      • D’Ausilio, A. (2007). The role of the mirror system in mapping complex sounds into actions. The Journal of Neuroscience, 27, 5847–5848. doi:10.1523/JNEUROSCI.0979-07.2007
      • D’Ausilio, A. (2009). Mirror-like mechanisms and music. The Scientific World Journal, 9, 1415–1422. doi:10.1100/tsw.2009.160
      • Gerson, S. A., Bekkering, H., and Hunnius, S. (2015a). Short-term motor training, but not observational training, alters neurocognitive mechanisms of action processing in infancy. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, 27, 1207–1214. doi: 10.1162/jocn_a_00774
      • Haslinger, B., Erhard, P., Altenmüller, E., Schroeder, U., Boecker, H., & Ceballos-Baumann, A. O. (2005). Transmodal sensorimotor networks during action observation in professional pianists. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, 17, 282–293. doi:10.1162/0898929053124893
      • Haueisen, J., & Knösche, T. R. (2001). Involuntary motor activity in pianists evoked by music perception. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, 13, 786–792. doi:10.1162/08989290152541449
      • Hickok-Gallese debate at NYU (2103) Do Mirror Neurons Explain Anything?
      • Kohler, E., Keysers, C., Umiltà, M. A., Fogassi, L., Gallese, V., and Rizzolatti, G. (2002). Hearing sounds, understanding actions: action representation in mirror neurons. Science, 297, 846–848. doi: 10.1126/science.1070311
      • Menary, R. (2010). Introduction to the special issue on 4E cognition. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences, 9, 459–463.
      • Mukamel R., Ekstrom A.D., Kaplan J., Iacoboni M., Fried I., Single-Neuron Responses in Humans during Execution and Observation of Actions. Current Biology, vol. 20, nº 8.
      • Novembre, G., Ticini, L. F., Schütz-Bosbach, S., & Keller, P. E. (2014). Motor simulation and the coordination of joint actions in real time. Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience, 9, 1062–1068. doi: 10.1093/scan/nst086
      • Overy, K., and Molnar-Szakacs, I. (2009). Being together in time: musical experience and the mirror neuron system. Music Perception, 26, 489–504. doi: 10.1525/mp.2009.26.5.489
      • Perone, S., Madole, K. L., Ross-Sheehy, S., Carey, M., and Oakes, L. M. (2009). The relation between infants’ activity with objects and attention to object appearance. Developmental Psycholology, 44, 1242–1248. doi: 10.1037/0012-1649.44.5.1242
      • Proffitt, D. R., Stefanucci, J., Banton, T., & Epstein, W. (2003). The role of effort in perceiving distance. Psychological Science, 14(2), 106-112.
      • Schiavio, A. & Timmers, R. (2016). Motor and audiovisual learning consolidate auditory memory of tonally ambiguous melodies. Music Perception, 34(1), 21-32
      • Schiavio, A. & van der Schyff, D. (2016). Beyond musical qualia. Reflecting on the concept of experience. Psychomusicology: Music, Mind, & Brain, 26(4), 366-378
      • Thompson, E. (2007). Mind in life: Biology, phenomenology, and the sciences of mind. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.
      • Varela, F., Thompson, E., & Rosch, E. (1991). The Embodied Mind. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press.
      • Wilson, A. D., & Golonka, S. (2013). Embodied cognition is not what you think it is. Frontiers in psychology, 4, 58.

    Credits

    The So Strangely Podcast is produced by Finn Upham, 2018. 

    The closing music includes a sample of Deutsch’s Speech-Song Illusion Sound Demo 1.

  • Episode

    Episode 3: Interactions of Metrical and Tonal Hierarchies with Bryn Hughes and guest Chris White

    Music Theorist Bryn Hughes recommends Chris White’s “Relationships Between Tonal Stability and Metrical Accent in Monophonic Contexts“, published in the Empirical Musicology Review (2017). Bryn and Finn interview Prof. White about his sequence of perceptual studies on how tonal stability may inform metrical hierarchy and vis versa, and together they discuss implications for music theory and some common issues in music cognition studies.

    Show notes

    Time Stamps

    • [0:00:10] Intro with Prof. Bryn Hughes
    • [0:11:48] Interview: Corpus studies inspiration and Study format
    • [0:23:31] Interview: Effect Size and Gender as a factor
    • [0:36:00] Interview: Experiment 4 and more design questions
    • [0:43:34] Interview: Follow up and future work
    • [0:53:33] Closing summary and surprises with Prof. Bryn Hughes

    Credits

    The So Strangely Podcast is produced by Finn Upham, 2018.

    The closing music includes a sample of Diana Deutsch’s Speech-Song Illusion Sound Demo 1.

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  • Episode

    Episode 2: Aligned Hierarchies and Segmentation with Vincent Lostanlen and guest Katherine Kinnaird

    Data Scientist Vincent Lostanlen recommends Katherine Kinnaird’s “Aligned Hierarchies: A Multi-Scale Structure-Based Representation for Music-Based Data Streams”, published in the proceedings of ISMIR (2016). Vincent and Finn interview Dr. Kinnaird about this method for abstracting structure in music through repetition, how it has been implemented for fingerprinting on Chopin’s Mazurkas, and how Aligned Hierarchies could be used for other tasks and on other musics.

    Show notes

    • Recommended article:
    • Interviewee: Dr. Katie Kinnaird, Data Sciences Postdoctoral Fellow, Affiliated to the Division of Applied Mathematics at Brown University twitter @kmkinnaird
    • Co-host: Dr. Vincent Lostanlen, Postdoctoral Researcher at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology, Visiting scholar at MARL at NYU, twitter: @lostanlen
    • Papers cited in the discussion:
      • M. Casey, C. Rhodes, and M. Slaney. Analysis of minimum distances in high-dimensional musical spaces. IEEE Transactions on Audio, Speech, and Language Processing, 16(5):1015 – 1028, 2008.
      • J. Foote. Visualizing music and audio using self- similarity. Proc. ACM Multimedia 99, pages 77–80, 1999.
      • M. Goto. A chorus-section detection method for musical audio signals and its application to a music listening station. IEEE Transactions on Audio, Speech, and Language Processing, 14(5):1783–1794, 2006.
      • P. Grosche, J. Serrà, M. Müller, and J.Ll. Arcos. Structure-based audio fingerprinting for music retrieval. 13th International Society for Music Information Retrieval Conference, 2012.

    Time Stamps

    • [0:00:10] Intro with Vincent Lostanlen
    • [0:17:22] Interview: Origins of the Aligned Hierarchies
    • [0:30:22] Interview: Implementation & Fingerprinting on the Mazurkas
    • [0:52:55] Interview: New applications and developments for Aligned Hierarchies
    • [1:02:57] Closing with Vincent Lostanlen

    Credits

    The So Strangely Podcast is produced by Finn Upham, 2018.

    The closing music includes a sample of Diana Deutsch’s Speech-Song Illusion Sound Demo 1.

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  • Episode

    Episode 1: Music Anhedonia and White Matter with Amy Belfi and guest Psyche Loui

    Neuroscientist Amy Belfi recommends “White Matter Correlates of Musical Anhedonia: Implications for Evolution of Music” by Loui, Patterson, Sachs, Leung, Zeng, and Przysinda, published in Frontiers in Psychology (2017). Amy and Finn interview Prof. Psyche Loui about this study, its relevance to theories of the evolution of music, and music anhedonia more broadly.

    Show notes

    • Recommended article:
      • Loui P, Patterson S, Sachs ME, Leung Y, Zeng T and Przysinda E (2017) White Matter Correlates of Musical Anhedonia: Implications for Evolution of Music. Front. Psychol. 8:1664. doi: 10.3389/fpsyg.2017.01664
    • Interviewee: Prof. Psyche Loui, Department of Psychology, Program in Neuroscience and Behavior, Wesleyan University
    • Co-host: Prof. Amy Belfi, Department of Psychological Science, Missouri University of Science and Technology
    • Papers cited in the discussion:
      • Altenmüller, E., Kopiez, R., and Grewe, O. (2013a). “A contribution to the evolutionary basis of music: lessons from the chill response,” in The Evolution of Emotional Communication: From Sounds in Nonhuman Mammals to Speech and Music in Man, eds E. Altenmüller, S. Schmidt, and E. Zimmermann (Oxford: Oxford University Press), 313–335.
      • Belfi, A. M., Evans, E., Heskje, J., Bruss, J., and Tranel, D. (2017). Musical anhedonia after focal brain damage. Neuropsychologia 97, 29–37. doi: 10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2017.01.030
      • Brielmann, A. A., & Pelli, D. G. (2017). Beauty requires thought. Current Biology, 27(10), 1506-1513.
      • Mas-Herrero, E., Marco-Pallares, J., Lorenzo-Seva, U., Zatorre, R. J., and Rodriguez-Fornells, A. (2013). Individual differences in Music Reward experiences. Music Percept. 31, 118–138. doi: 10.1525/mp.2013.31.2.118
      • Sachs, M. E., Ellis, R. J., Schlaug, G., and Loui, P. (2016). Brain connectivity reflects human aesthetic responses to music. Soc. Cogn. Aect. Neurosci. 11, 884–891. doi: 10.1093/scan/nsw009

    Time Stamps

    • [0:00:10] Intro with Amy Belfi
    • [0:15:15] Interview: Where this study comes from
    • [0:20:12] Interview: Components of research project
    • [0:31:47] Interview: Results
    • [0:44:55] Interview: Implications
    • [0:59:05] Closing with Amy Belfi

    Credits

    The So Strangely Podcast is produced by Finn Upham, 2018.

    The closing music includes a sample of Diana Deutsch’s Speech-Song Illusion sound demo 1.

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  • About,  Episode

    Episode 0: Introducing The So Strangely Podcast

    A short introduction to The So Strangely Podcast on recent research in Music Science.

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    Follow the podcast on Twitter @sostrangelypod

    Get in touch with the producer, finn @ sostrangely.com

    ****

    The So Strangely Podcast is produced by Finn Upham, 2018.

    Closing music includes a sample of Diana Deutsch’s speech-song illusion sound demo 1.

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  • About

    Why So Strangely?

    One of the most famous examples of music science research was the discovery of the Speech-Song Illusion by Diana Deutsch. Turns out that looping a short clip of someone talking, playing the same exact utterance over and over, changes how we processing the sound. What is initially perceived as a simple excerpt of speech becomes a rhythmic, melodic song.

    Deutsch first demonstrated this with a clip of her own speech from the sentence:

    “The sounds as they appear to you are not only different from those that are really present, but they sometimes behave so strangely as to seem quite impossible.”

    She looped the phrase “sometimes behave so strangely” in several clever experiments.

    In the years since, “Sometimes behave so strangely” has become a catch phrase in music cognition, and many people no longer need an audio reference to recall this curious and persistent effect.

    And beside some famous words, this podcast is called “So Strangely” because music science research often behaves in unexpected ways.

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  • About,  Announcements

    Welcome to the So Strangely Podcast

    Hello and welcome to the So Strangely Podcast, a new podcast on recent research in Music Science.

    What is music science? That is a good question. Its the array of empirically motivated work on the stuff of music, or so we are defining it.

    • Neuroscience of embodied perception? Sure.
    • Corpus studies of chord progressions?  Yup.
    • Listeners subjective experiences of concert performances? Of course.
    • Music pedagogy? Yes!
    • Automatic chord detection? I should hope so.
    • Origins of music? Definitely.

    I’m Finn, host and producer, but the programming of this podcast isn’t just up to me. So Strangely will be sharing work that other music academics recommend, recent publications they want their peers to hear about.

    Every episode, I’ll have another music academic on as a co-host to interview the lead researcher on a recently published project. My co-host is here to talk inside baseball, get into the nitty-gritty of the research as an expert. I’ll be there to help translate for those of us in adjacent disciplines.

    Because here is the thing: music science is so interdisciplinary, we often have trouble keeping track of what’s going on in other areas. It can even be a struggle to understand what this other group of academics are so excited about. With this two pronged approach, So Strangely will try to bridge those gaps and helps us within the broader music science research community follow and appreciate what’s new next door.

    Here is the warning: this podcast is pitched for people into music and science, not for the general population. We won’t be explaining scales every episode, or breaking down the basics of the experimental method. You don’t need a PhD to follow (I mean, I don’t have a PhD… yet) but some prior contact with music science research will help.

    And if there is a recent publication you want more people to know about and you are interested in being on the show, pitch it to us!

    Full episodes are in the works, with recordings and scheduling and editing underway. For now, follow us on twitter, and check back soon so you don’t miss out how music science research sometimes behaves so strangely.

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